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JUNIOR WATERSHED RANGER PROGRAM

July 2012

Instructed by Bill Glover

JUNIOR WATERSHED RANGER PROGRAM

July 2010

Instructed by Bill Glover

Monday July 12, 2010

The class learned about the basics of what is a watershed as well as point and non point source pollution and how our watershed is affected. We used the PWA watershed model to demonstrate this process.

Mothers are also interested.

Dianne Stanton & Joanne Tavares

Tuesday July 13, 2010

The class went to the Herring Brook to learn about the health of the brook and why this is important to the overall health of the watershed.

The main part of the field study was to collect macroinvertabrates (bugs) in the brook. The bugs were collected to be used to identify which bugs were tolerant and which were intolerant to pollution.

This was a good way for the class to see that just by collecting bugs, we can look at the overall health of the brook, and in turn, part of our watershed.

Wednesday July 14, 2010

The class was able to use microscopes and websites to identify which of the bugs were intolerant to pollution.

We discovered that we had a number of bugs that were intolerant to pollution and this helped us to see that the brook was pretty healthy.


Thursday July 15, 2010

The class went to the Lucky Dawg Restaurant parking lot and we were able to look at the different weeds that are around the edge of Furnace Pond.

Included in this field study was drawing the different plants, dissecting the inside of some of the plants, identifying some of the plants and getting a general idea of the problems with weeds on a pond.

We also were able to see that the clarity of Furnace Pond was not as good as the clarity at Herring Brook.

Friday July 16, 2010

The class went back to Herring Brook to continue with the bug investigation. We were able to use the flow meters and collect bugs where the brook branches off.

Here we found a number of bugs that we hadn't collected the last time we were there.

These were also intolerant bugs so more proof that the brook was pretty healthy. Students were awarded certificates making them Junior Watershed Rangers. They were also invited to the Pembroke Watershed meeting in the fall to share their experiences.

Brian Morley, age 10, accepting his Watershed Ranger certificate.

Ben Stanton, age 8, accepting his Watershed Ranger certificate.

Brian Morley, age 10, accepting his Watershed Ranger certificate.

The overall assessment was positive from both students and parents, and the hope is that we can continue with additional educational programs in the fall.